PEACE OF MIND FOR YOU
 PEACE OF MIND FOR YOU
How long do you think you'll live?

When we are young, we assume that our own death will happen a great distance in the future, once we reach old age.  We don't consciously think of it in mathematical terms, yet this assumption functions like an equation.

Something like this:

How long do you think you'll live?

When we are young, we assume that our own death will happen a great distance in the future, once we reach old age.  We don't consciously think of it in mathematical terms, yet this assumption functions like an equation.

Something like this:

If x is our current age, and y is the "acceptable" age to die, then:

x >= y ----> Death
If x = our current age, and y = "acceptable" death age, then:

x >= y ----> Death
In other words, death only occurs after we reach or exceed whatever age we believe is a probable age at which to die.  Maybe you assume "y" in this equation is 70 years old.  Perhaps 85 years old.

As we get older, however, we realize that there is no iron-clad formula.

In other words, death only occurs after we reach or exceed whatever age we believe is a probable age at which to die.  Maybe you assume "y" in this equation is 70 years old.  Perhaps 85 years old.

As we get older, however, we realize that there is no iron-clad formula.

It really doesn't matter what we think is a "permissible" or "likely" age at which to die.  Death happens when it happens, and it's not likely we'll have any control over it.
The idea of not having control over death is terrifying to many people, so they choose not to think about it.  Thinking about death means looking at one's own life so far for context, and a lot of people don't want to do that, either.

Looking to the past, they may feel loss because of things that happened, and they may feel regret over things that didn't.

Looking forward, they may feel apprehension over the unknown outcome of their estate's eventual resolution, or they may feel anxiety about their surviving family's future welfare.

This entire topic can elicit a number of very uncomfortable feelings.  Some of them are more painful than others. However, refusing to acknowledge and act on this matter will result in the burden of an even worse feeling later on.

The feeling of  GUILT .

The idea of not having control over death is terrifying to many people, so they choose not to think about it.  Thinking about death means looking at one's own life so far for context, and a lot of people don't want to do that, either.

Looking to the past, they may feel loss because of things that happened, and they may feel regret over things that didn't.

Looking forward, they may feel apprehension over the unknown outcome of their estate's eventual resolution, or they may feel anxiety about their surviving family's future welfare.

This entire topic can elicit a number of very uncomfortable feelings.  Some of them are more painful than others. However, refusing to acknowledge and act on this matter will result in the burden of an even worse feeling later on.

The feeling of  GUILT .


Specifically, the guilt of knowing you could have done more to prepare your affairs in advance than you actually did.


  Specifically, the guilt of knowing
you could have done more to
prepare your affairs in advance
than you actually did.
  

You owe it to yourself to give yourself the gift of peace of mind.

Knowing that you made all of the hard decisions ahead of time -- whether for the benefit of surviving loved ones or an estate executor --  lifts a weight of dread from your chest.  There may not be many elements tangent to our own death that we can control, but proactive logistics planning is one of them.

When the end of your life finally arrives -- whenever that may be -- you can rest assured that you proactively made as many preparations as possible, taking that responsibility off of someone else's shoulders.

That leaves you with something far more valuable -- time to reflect on positive memories, and even time to make some new ones.

You owe it to yourself to give yourself the gift of peace of mind.

Knowing that you made all of the hard decisions ahead of time -- whether for the benefit of surviving loved ones or an estate executor --  lifts a weight of dread from your chest. 

There may not be many elements tangent to our own death that we can control, but proactive logistics planning is one of them.

When the end of your life finally arrives -- whenever that may be -- you can rest assured that you proactively made as many preparations as possible, taking that responsibility off of someone else's shoulders.

That leaves you with something far more valuable -- time to reflect on positive memories, and even time to make some new ones.

© 2023 Megan Snipes
[bot_catcher]